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Collection

A solid gold evening bag by Lacloche Frères

Paris, circa 1900 - 1905.

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in the form of a pedigree pig with beautifully chased face with floppy ears, the surface engraved to mimic fine hairs, the body formed from a fine gold mesh from which are suspended four legs with trotters, with a curly tale at the hinge. A discreet catch at the top opens the bag, with a twisted loop, suspended from a fancy link gold chain.

Signed: LACLOCHE FRES
Maker’s poinçon: Julien Duval
Numbered: 317 and 11738
Stamped with French eagle’s head mark for 18ct gold

Length: 17cm

Illustrated

Pg 59-60, Lacloche Joailliers (Mouillefarine and Ristelhueber, 2019)

The firm Lacloche Frères was established following the death of Jacques Lacloche in 1900, when his remaining brothers went into business together. By the following year, they had settled at 15 Rue de la Paix in Paris. The firm specialised in the finest jewellery and objets de vertu, collaborating with some of the most famous workshops working in Paris. By 1908, they had a total of seven stores across Europe, including a shop on Bond Street in London. In 1917, they acquired the stock of Carl Fabergé’s Bond Street shop when it was forced to close following the Russian Revolution.

The firm also acquired the famous pink Agra diamond in 1904 and were commissioned to make an extraordinary Art Deco diadem which contained the Arcot diamonds for Loelia, Duchess of Westminster, for her wedding in 1930.

Julien Duval established himself as a jeweller in partnership with Georges Le Turq in 1885, after they had met at the Ecole des Arts Décoratifs. They worked together until 1894, in which year Duval registered his own poinçon (the mark which appears on this bag). This mark was in use between 1894 and 1935. He was registered at 17 Rue de Louvre in Paris. Duval also collaborated with the skilled medallist Frédéric de Vernon, who was also a student at the Ecole. Together they created the famous thimble which Henri Vever illustrated in La Bijouterie Française au XIXe Siècle, which was commissioned by President Kruger to give to Queen Wilhelmina of Holland.